Blossom Festival News 2019

Celebrating Establishment of Camp Lister 100 Years.

Lister 100 Years

Celebrating Blossom Festival

By Hugh Johnson
Another year has passed, and once again the people of the Creston Valley can take a short break from their everyday problems and focus on what the good life means to call Creston a place to live, work, and enjoy life to the fullest in the greatest place to live. ... Every year at this time, we take a break from the day to day ordinary and along with our neighbours enjoy the good life as we welcome spring in all its glory. Critics have often said that you can’t hold a community event on a long weekend because everyone has taken off. Well, such is the popularity of the Blossom Fest that instead of the mass exodus there is a migration every year of folks coming home, families reuniting, all because of the draw of the Blossom Festival. It all begins Friday night with the Opening Ceremonies Stage Show, this year featuring Juno award-winning Country Duo, Doc Walker. On a recent Western Canada tour the band stopped in Varden, Manitoba where they did a standing room only sold out show and did three encores. Creston people should expect the same kind of show but with the larger venue- almost 400 can be seated at the Prince Charles Theatre. After local dignities officially open the festival, the other main event will be the Rotary Club announcing the name of this year’s Citizen of the Year. The winner will also get to ride in a special convertible in Saturday’s Blossom Festival Parade that begins at 11 am on 18th Avenue at Creston Motel, then heads west on Canyon Street to the Creston Valley Mall.
Saturday begins with the Lions Club pancake breakfast from 7 am to 11 am outside Sunset Seed parking lot. Also on Saturday is the Lions Street Fair in Spirit Square from 9 am until 3 pm. Saturday afternoon join music fans for the Lions Free Concert in Millennium Park. Bring a rain hat or brolly just in case, your lawn chairs and a blanket. The Lions will be selling popcorn and cold drinks. The concert runs from 2 pm until 5 pm featuring eight local musicians. Also on Saturday is the Extreme Cowboy Challenge at 633 Indian Rd off lower Wynndell Road from 10 am until 2 pm. This one is right out of the old west! Don’t forget Saturday’s Lower Kootenay Band Pow Wow at 830 Simon Road from 1 pm to 5 pm. Sunday begins with the Knights of Columbus Western Breakfast, featuring Texas Toast, scrambled eggs, juice, coffee, and bacon, all at Holy Cross Hall. For the car buffs, don’t miss the Classic Car Show which runs downtown on Canyon Street from 9 am until 4 pm. The Lions Club will have their concession on Canyon Street with chili, hot dogs and buns. Holiday Monday has the Teen Art walk in the downtown core.
The Lions Children’s Parade begins in Millennium Park, heading down Cedar Street to Centennial Park where the Lions Children’s Picnic begins. It is going to be a busy weekend, one where you don’t have to leave town to have a good time. Such is life in the Kootenays!

Sponsor Thank You's

SPONSORS

 

Parade Entry Winners

  • Best Non-Commercial – WINNER
  • Best Commercial – WINNER
  • Best Out of Town – WINNER
  • Best Street Rod – WINNER
  • Best Antique Car – WINNER
  • Best Costume, Group & Hitch (Equestrian) – WINNER

 

Citizens Awards

Creston Valley's Citizen's of the Year for 2019.

maurice maury

2019 Citizen of the Year-Maurice Maury Murphy

At Friday night’s Blossom Festival opening celebrations, the name Maury Murphy was added to the illustrious list of Creston Citizens of the Year....more

olivia kettle

2019 Junior Citizen of the Year-Olivia Kettle...

A 2019 PCSS graduate and member of the Community Fire Hall Advisory Select Committee, Olivia Kettle, was named Creston Valley’s Junior Citizen of the Year at Friday night’s Blossom Festival opening ceremonies...more

Blossom Festival Parade

The 78th Creston Valley Blossom Festival Parade started with a fly over by the Creston Flying Club. Approximately 68 parade entries took part.
2019 blossom festival parade

Thanks to the road traffic volunteers along the parade route.
parade security volunteers

Creston Lions Chili Feed

the Creston Lions served up their Chili Feed at their yearly location on Canyon Street at the Classic Car Show for the 78th Creston Valley Blossom Festival.
creston lions club chilli

Up and down the street admiring all the classic vehicles.

2019 classic car show

Hot Summer Nights

Lions August 2019 Fundraiser Event_Poster
A Creston Lions Club Project with proceeds to the new Riverside Park

Teen Art Walk

Teen Art Walk contributed to Blossom Festival downtown weekend activities. Teen artwork was displayed at many businesses.

teen art walk

teen art walk 2

Button Draw

Congratulations to the 2019 Blossom Festival Button Draw Winner - Janice Andrist

Entertainment


mary beth stenhouse
The talented Mary Beth Stenhouse provided on street entertainment.

Street Fair


2019 street fair
In spite of the cool weather, vendors reported that their sales were good and they looked forward to participating again next year.

Cowboy Challenge


2019 cowboy challenge
The Cowboy Challenge event was enjoyed by those who participated and by the spectators.

Museum


2019 museum

Tammy displays the miniature log hauler. The Museum had many visitors over the weekend, there were 35 – 40 people at the opening and as of Sunday, over 100 people had visited.

Children's Parade


2019 childrens parade
The children had a good time. The RCMP and Creston Fire Rescue were there to assist with providing a safe parade for the children.

Airport Appreciation Day


2019 airport appreciation day
The airport appreciation day was a success.


2019 wings and wheels
The Airport Wings and Wheels event was very well done.

Lister 100 Year History

Lister, British Columbia is a small community in the Kootenays region of British Columbia, Canada. It is located 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Creston and is just north of the Canada-US border.

camp lister settlers
Camp Lister Settlers

Originally known as Camp Lister, it was established by Colonel Fred Lister after World War I as a soldier's settlement. Fred Lister later became the MLA for the Nelson-Creston riding. The community's name officially changed to Lister on November 29, 1984

COL. FRED LISTER

Col. Fred Lister

Lister was established, in June 1919, as a settlement for approximately 90 soldiers returning from the Great War. About 7,000 acres of logged-off land were purchased, divided up into 20-acre lots, and sold to the soldiers. Five acres of each lot were cleared, with the rest to be done by the settlers themselves. Until the clearing was done, the settlers with families lived in “Snake Alley” – a cluster of small shacks near the camp headquarters. There were a cookhouse and a communal dining room, and bunk houses for the single men. Office staff included an accountant and an assistant, as well as superintendent Col. Fred Lister, who were kept busy with all the administrative details involved. All of this was organised by the Land Settlement Board (LSB), a division of the provincial Department of Agriculture.
The LSB established a sawmill in the community, and a school. It assisted the settlers in acquiring farm equipment, livestock, and even fruit trees. It was responsible for establishing a store, under the management of William Mitchell. This store is referred to variously as the “Lister store,” the “camp store,” and the “company store,” with “company” in this case undoubtedly referring to the LSB.

demchuk homestead

Demchuck Homestead

By the beginning of 1920, the community of Lister (Camp Lister, as it was called back then) was an established fact. Weekly newspaper columns detail the progress of the community, its farms and industries, its social activities and organisations. There are fairly regular reports of mishaps mixed in with the good news: injuries and illnesses suffered by residents, sudden resignations of school teachers, and this amusing anecdote from October 1920:

“This week Vinc. Liddicoatt drove into camp with a Ford car and the destruction of dogs, poultry, etc., he accomplished on his initial trip through the settlement is largely responsible for the rush for accident insurance.”

Lister trading and Supply Co. was incorporated in the spring of 1921, with William Mitchell returning as manager. He was succeeded by A.R. Bernard, and in October 1922 John Bird took over the management, running the store – and eventually acquiring full control of it – until 1949. He sold it to the Creston Valley Co-operative Association, who ran it for five more years. It was then permanently closed, as another store, the Lister Mercantile, had been established by the Huscroft brothers.

lister 1958 centennial

Lister Residents 1958 Centennial Celebration

Lister, a community established in 1919 for returning soldiers, was failing by the mid-1920s. The soldiers, faced with overwhelming challenges to establish their farms, had moved on and the land was vacant. “By 1926,” wrote original settler John Bird, “the population had dwindled and it looked as though the young settlement was going to fail.” The remaining settlers worked with the provincial government, the Department of Immigration, and the Canada Colonization Board (a department of the Canadian Pacific Railway) to attract new settlers. Many of these new residents were Europeans who had immigrated to Canada only a year or two before and were looking for the ideal place to settle. “FB McConnell, representing the Canadian Colonisation Company, was here at the end of the week, and as a result seven of the German residents have now signed their agreements to purchase farms. This assured that half the newcomers now residing here are likely to remain permanently.” Creston Review, 31 January 1930

Friday Night Opening Ceremonies Entertainment

doc walker

With over 20 Top 10 singles in total, Doc Walker is one of the most recognized Canadian country acts of the past two decades. The group has received multiple Canadian Country Music Awards, including Fans' Choice, Group or Duo of the Year, CMT Video of the Year, Single of the Year, and Country Music Program or Special of the Year. In addition, Doc Walker has been nominated for several JUNO Awards for Country Album of the Year, including a win in 2009 for the album Beautiful Life.
Published on Feb 4, 2019

Blossom Festival to take on country flavour
By Lorne Eckersley

The 2019 Creston Valley Blossom Festival will have a distinctive country music flavor, with Canadian legends Doc Walker opening the Festival on Friday night and Renegade Station performing in a cabaret on Saturday evening. Juno and Canadian Country Music Association nominations and awards are pretty much a dime a dozen for Doc Walker. With over 20 Top 10 singles in total, the group is one of the most recognized Canadian country acts of the past two decades. Doc Walker has received multiple CCMAs, including Fans’ Choice, Group or Duo of the Year, CMT Video of the Year, Single of the Year, and Country Music Program or Special of the Year. In addition, it has been nominated for several JUNO Awards for Country Album of the Year, including a win in 2009 for the album Beautiful Life. As per recent tradition, the 2019 Blossom Festival will open with greetings from dignitaries, and include the announcements of the Citizen of the Year and Junior Citizen of the Year. But Doc Walker will also be a huge draw for country music fans and tickets are expected to go fast. The country legends recently released their new album, Weathervane. The first single from the new record, “Heart of the Heartland,” pays homage to smalltown pride across the country.

Appearing May 18, 2019 Saturday Night Cabaret featuring Renegade Station

renegade station 2019

 

The attention turns to the Creston & District Community Complex on Saturday night, where the popular Alberta group Renegade Station highlights a Cabaret, which will also serve as a fundraiser for the Creston Legion. Legion supporters will be running a bar, and those proceeds will go to the Creston Legion. Renegade Station is a four-musician group that is also no strang to awards. From their humble beginnings in Stettler AB, where they played as a dance and party band for several years as Domino, the rebranded group has become a hit-producing favourite as Renegade Station. Its Association of Country Music in Alberta awards include ACMA 2018 Single of the Year, 2015 and 2016 Group of the Year and 2015 Fans Choice Winner. With the release of their new album, Along for the Ride, Renegade Station embarks on a dynamic musical journey that sees the talented quartet elevating their already impressive reputation for creative excellence and superior showmanship to new heights. Tickets for the Opening Ceremonies at Prince Charles Theatre on Friday, May 17, 7:00 pm, featuring Doc Walker, are $40 each at Black Bear Books. Sponsors for the event are Pealow’s Independent and Creston Home Hardware Building Centre. Tickets for the Cabaret featuring Renegade Station in the Creston Room on Saturday, May 18, 7:30 pm are $20. They are available at the Creston Legion and Black Bear Books.

Friday Night Headliner

Checkout the Opening Ceremony headline entertainment.

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Celebrate this years theme.

Check out theme page.

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Citizen of the Year

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Photo Gallery

Check out the Photo Gallery.

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Parade Entry Form

Download a copy of the Blossom Festival Entry Form.

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Blossom News

Blossom Festival News Articles. Submit your event news. blossom news archive

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